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I'm Empowered!
I Matter!

I'm Empowered!

I can be me. I have choices. I have friends. I have people who want to see me succeed.

I Matter!

I can make a difference if given the right chance. I can be productive if given the right job. I can be happy and lead a full and meaningful life if given the right opportunities.

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) - Page 2

 

In Tennessee, approximately 8,000 people per year are injured and admitted to the hospital with TBI, a rate of 125 injuries per 100,000 people. TBI survivors can experience impairments that affect their physical, cognitive and behavioral functioning which in turn impacts their ability to return to home, school and work. Whether the injury is the result of a car crash, a fall, assault or sports activity, there can be an economic and emotional toll on the survivor and the family. The focus of the TBI Program is to improve services available to survivors of TBI and their families. 

In 1996, the Brain Injury Association of the MidSouth in Memphis successfully collaborated with Accessible Space, Inc. (ASI) of Minneapolis, MN, to develop a HUD Section 811 application for very low income housing for persons with disabilities. The resulting two facilities provide accessible and affordable housing apartment units for adults with physical disabilities, including traumatic brain injury. Qualifying persons pay approximately 30% of their adjusted gross monthly income for rent. Accessible Space, Inc. manages the property. In order to be eligible to live in the apartment facility, an individual must qualify for very-low income housing; be capable of living independently with supportive services; be aware of medications; be able to make appropriate choices and not exhibit behaviors that are self-injurious, harmful to others or destructive of property. 

 

This grant program is to provide assistance with certain activities of daily living to qualified residents in Memphis, enabling persons with TBI to live as independently as possible. Personal care services can include prompting, cueing, supervision and assistance with bathing, grooming, dressing, toileting, transfers, positioning, mobility, assistance with medication, meal preparation, eating, housekeeping and laundry. TNCSA manages the project with qualified staff with education and experience in providing activities of daily living, particularly with vulnerable populations.  The agency approaches its work with vulnerable individuals in a compassionate, strengths-based manner.  The agency works cooperatively with the Department of Health to insure all  services and deliverables as required in this Grant are met on a monthly, quarterly and annual basis. 

Here is a link to an article with some practical tips for what not to say to someone who has a brain injury.